Laurie Ann Thompson

INSPIRING AND EMPOWERING YOUNG READERS

46,137 notes

lauriehalseanderson:

catsbeaversandducks:

Post-it Notes Left on the Train

Writer and illustrator October Jones, the creative genius behind Text From Dog and these funny train commute doodles, is at it again with these hilarious motivational post-it notes that he leaves on the train and in other random places.The upbeat doodles, which star Jones’ adorable character Peppy the Inspirational Cat, convey positive and funny messages meant to motivate daily commuters. Whether you’re feeling the Monday blues or in need of some encouragement, Jones’ delightful post-it notes are sure to brighten your day and remind you just how awesome you are.

Via My Modern Metropolis 

Thanks Amber, for passing these along!

Cute!

80 notes

nprbooks:

Image via the New York Times
Awww, bless their little hearts; the NYT has discovered how many working F/SF writers are influenced by Dungeons & Dragons!  They’ve got a great quote from our perennial literary crush Junot Diaz: 

Playing D&D and spinning tales of heroic quests, “we welfare kids could travel,” Mr. Díaz, 45, said in an email interview, “have adventures, succeed, be powerful, triumph, fail and be in ways that would have been impossible in the larger real world.”
“For nerds like us, D&D hit like an extra horizon,” he added. The game functioned as “a sort of storytelling apprenticeship.”

They actually dig pretty deeply into the relationship between D&D and traditional storytelling:

What makes a D&D story different from novels and other narratives is its improvisational and responsive nature. Plotlines are decided as a group. As a D&D player, “you have to convince other players that your version of the story is interesting and valid,” said Jennifer Grouling, an assistant professor of English at Ball State University who studied D&D players for her book, “The Creation of Narrative in Tabletop Role-Playing Games.”
If a Dungeon Master creates “a boring world with an uninteresting plot,” she said, players can go in a completely different direction; likewise, the referee can veto the action of player. “I think D&D can help build the skills to work collaboratively and to write collaboratively,” she added. (Mr. Díaz called this the “social collaborative component” of D&D.)

The rebooted D&D starter kit is out today — but really all you need is paper, pencils, dice, and imagination.  Go tell some stories!
— Petra (chaotic good half-elf sorceror, in case you’re wondering)

Love this. I experienced so many great stories, and friendships, in my teens through playing D&D. To this day, I’m thankful to my big brother and his friends for letting me tag along. (Chaotic good gnomish thief)

nprbooks:

Image via the New York Times

Awww, bless their little hearts; the NYT has discovered how many working F/SF writers are influenced by Dungeons & Dragons!  They’ve got a great quote from our perennial literary crush Junot Diaz: 

Playing D&D and spinning tales of heroic quests, “we welfare kids could travel,” Mr. Díaz, 45, said in an email interview, “have adventures, succeed, be powerful, triumph, fail and be in ways that would have been impossible in the larger real world.”

“For nerds like us, D&D hit like an extra horizon,” he added. The game functioned as “a sort of storytelling apprenticeship.”

They actually dig pretty deeply into the relationship between D&D and traditional storytelling:

What makes a D&D story different from novels and other narratives is its improvisational and responsive nature. Plotlines are decided as a group. As a D&D player, “you have to convince other players that your version of the story is interesting and valid,” said Jennifer Grouling, an assistant professor of English at Ball State University who studied D&D players for her book, “The Creation of Narrative in Tabletop Role-Playing Games.”

If a Dungeon Master creates “a boring world with an uninteresting plot,” she said, players can go in a completely different direction; likewise, the referee can veto the action of player. “I think D&D can help build the skills to work collaboratively and to write collaboratively,” she added. (Mr. Díaz called this the “social collaborative component” of D&D.)

The rebooted D&D starter kit is out today — but really all you need is paper, pencils, dice, and imagination.  Go tell some stories!

— Petra (chaotic good half-elf sorceror, in case you’re wondering)

Love this. I experienced so many great stories, and friendships, in my teens through playing D&D. To this day, I’m thankful to my big brother and his friends for letting me tag along. (Chaotic good gnomish thief)

19,832 notes

rookiemag:

womenrockscience:

tumblingtheology:

bookishboi:

lastrealindians:

Teen scientist harnesses sun power to help Navajo community
New Mexico teen Raquel Redshirt uses everyday materials and the sun to build solar ovens, fulfilling a Navajo community need and winning an award at the Intel ISEF competition.
Growing up on New Mexico’s Navajo Nation, Raquel Redshirt was well aware of the needs of her community. Many of her impoverished neighbors lacked basics such as electricity, as well as stoves and ovens to cook food.
Though resources in the high desert are limited, Raquel realized one was inexhaustible: the sun. “That’s where I got the idea of building a solar oven,” the teen says.
She researched solar ovens and found that most incorporate mirrors or other expensive materials. Raquel wanted to create a design that anyone could easily afford and replicate, using readily available materials.
READ MORE HERE: http://lrinspire.com/2014/06/19/teen-scientist-harnesses-sun-power-to-help-navajo-community/

Yes!!

GO NEW MEXICO! GO NAVAJO NATION! GO BRILLIANT TEENAGE GIRLS!

It has to be said, teenage girls are kind of killing it right now!

SICK
- Hazel

Way to go, Raquel!

rookiemag:

womenrockscience:

tumblingtheology:

bookishboi:

lastrealindians:

Teen scientist harnesses sun power to help Navajo community

New Mexico teen Raquel Redshirt uses everyday materials and the sun to build solar ovens, fulfilling a Navajo community need and winning an award at the Intel ISEF competition.

Growing up on New Mexico’s Navajo Nation, Raquel Redshirt was well aware of the needs of her community. Many of her impoverished neighbors lacked basics such as electricity, as well as stoves and ovens to cook food.

Though resources in the high desert are limited, Raquel realized one was inexhaustible: the sun. “That’s where I got the idea of building a solar oven,” the teen says.

She researched solar ovens and found that most incorporate mirrors or other expensive materials. Raquel wanted to create a design that anyone could easily afford and replicate, using readily available materials.

READ MORE HERE: http://lrinspire.com/2014/06/19/teen-scientist-harnesses-sun-power-to-help-navajo-community/

Yes!!

GO NEW MEXICO! GO NAVAJO NATION! GO BRILLIANT TEENAGE GIRLS!

It has to be said, teenage girls are kind of killing it right now!

SICK

- Hazel

Way to go, Raquel!